The Official announcement of The CMF participating in A Nation Soars.

The Canadian Museum of Flight in association with Sound Ventures and The Royal Canadian Geographic  Society will be participating in the First World War commemorative project Wings of Courage, and Flight Path of Heroes as part of the A Nation Soars program.   The CMF is tasked with building then flying two replica Sopwith Pup Biplanes.  Once completed. the two planes are to be formally gifted to the CMF to become part of a permanent exhibit.



Harvard MK II Annual in full swing at Langley Aero

The rudder's trim tab bearings were replaced

The engine is getting a detailed inspection

The outboard aileron cables have been replaced. Note the splice on the old cable. It's a lost art today in aviation. Working with needle-sharp steel cable ends is not for the faint of heart! The modern equivalent is the machine-manufactured swage fitting, shown at front.

If you want to get into wire splicing, here is a sample from the Vintage Aviator Restoration Company in New Zealand.


Historic Avro images discovered at the Museum

Museums are known for having only a small portion of their collection on display. Some of the displays are tucked away in storage and may become 'lost in time' to the present employees.

During a recent inventory, a box of old glass negatives was discovered. The images were like a time warp of the early days of aircraft manufacture in the British Empire. They tell the story of the early days of Avro, the British manufacturer that was known in more recent times for the Lancaster and Vulcan bombers.

Check out some of the photographs in our Aviation History section; 

Back to Baddeck - the CMF experience

Under the leadership of the Canadian Aeronautical Preservation Association (CAPA), aviation museums and aviation heritage sites across Canada celebrated the 100th anniversary of powered flight in Canada with a unique and historically oriented event - a coast-to-coast-to-coast flying relay to mark this very significant aviation milestone. This Canada relay stopped at all of the CAPA member museums across Canada, at each provincial/territorial capital as well as in the nation’s capital, Ottawa, and was completed using a variety of vintage aircraft.

The Canadian Museum of Flight (CMF), BC’s only flying aviation museum, played a major role in this relay. The Museum’s Harvard flew from Comox to Victoria and the Tiger Moth, from Victoria to Langley. This story unfolds as the CMF’s 1937 Waco and crew took their turn at being a part of history and continuing the relay, with the mail bag in hand, to Nanton, AB.  


Canadian Museum of Flight Announces New Logo.


At the Annual General Meeting of the Canadian Museum of Flight on April 25, 2009, the new Museum logo was officially unveiled.

The Museum has had a new logo in transition for some time – that of the Handley Page Hampden. The Hampden is a unique symbol at our Museum, but virtually unknown except among dedicated aircraft fans. This logo also had some shortcomings in its presentation. While it was acceptable on letter size printed material, it lacked definition when printed on larger items, such as shirts.

The Directors studied this problem and came to the decision that it would not be acceptable to go back to the previous logo of the yellow Tiger Moth. Instead we should be forward looking to something that is unique in our collection. One aircraft that met the criteria was the Waco AQC-6 Cabin biplane. It has a long history of flying in BC – about 55 years – and was a unique airplane compared to the ubiquitous Tiger Moth. The red and cream colour scheme made it especially suitable for use as a logo for the Museum.

Well known local photographer, Cam Hutchins, provided the image taken during air-to-air photography with Museum aircraft, and Acro Media Inc. of Kelowna, BC did the design work to provide the logo that is now in use.